Colt 1851 Navy .36 (C13680)

Colt 1851 Navy .36 caliber revolver with Hartford Address Barrel. This is a gunsmith conversion of a percussion Colt, after the Civil War. The action works fine and visible serial numbers are matching. This is an uncleaned near relic condition revolver. We have commented before on the collectible aspect of relic guns, and our opinion that these guns have an attraction and charm of their own. How and where did the gun come from? What could have happened to it to arrive at this condition? The revolver has not only that “relic” appeal but is a collectible example of the gunsmith’s work. He cut the cylinder where the nipples go and welded in a “conversion plate”. Using the original percussion hammer, he reshaped the nose into a conical, almost nail like projection, to strike a rimfire cartridge. This is crude work, but you can’t help but smile in wonder at the creativeness or lack thereof. If you buy it please don’t clean it. Mother nature’s work (rush and corrosion) should be left alone in this case.

Price:
$975.00
Item Number:
C13680
Weight:
0.00 LBS
Colt 1851 Navy .36 caliber revolver with Hartford Address Barrel. This is a gunsmith conversion of a percussion Colt, after the Civil War. The action works fine and visible serial numbers are matching. This is an uncleaned near relic condition revolver. We have commented before on the collectible aspect of relic guns, and our opinion that these guns have an attraction and charm of their own. How and where did the gun come from? What could have happened to it to arrive at this condition? The revolver has not only that “relic” appeal but is a collectible example of the gunsmith’s work. He cut the cylinder where the nipples go and welded in a “conversion plate”. Using the original percussion hammer, he reshaped the nose into a conical, almost nail like projection, to strike a rimfire cartridge. This is crude work, but you can’t help but smile in wonder at the creativeness or lack thereof. If you buy it please don’t clean it. Mother nature’s work (rush and corrosion) should be left alone in this case.

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