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AHM Volume 7 Issue 5

ARMS HERITAGE Magazine

  • THE LAST WORD Vol 7 - issue 5
    THE LAST WORD Vol 7 - issue 5
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    Once again the Ivory crushers are at it. In an article in August, the Associated Press reported that two tons of ivory were crushed to dust in New York City in late July of this year. Included were priceless artifacts such as netsuke, one reportedly worth $14,000 and a pair of carved tusks with an appraised value of $850,000. Reportedly, Tiffany and Company partnered with the Wildlife Conservation Society on the “Ivory Crush”, an event proudly witnessed by Federal, State and City officials.

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  • I HAVE THIS GUN Vol 7 - issue 5
  • TIDBITS Vol 7 - issue 5
    TIDBITS Vol 7 - issue 5
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    Those Unmarked Revolver Molds Unfortunately only Colt, Manhattan, Mass. Arms Co. and a very few others had the courtesy to stamp their company names on the bullet molds that accompanied their revolvers. Fortunately, after extensive research, mostly by Drury Williford in the 1990’s, several of the unmarked molds can now be identified by their characteristic bullets, general shapes and details.

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  • THE CARTRIDGE HOUND Vol 7 - issue 5
    THE CARTRIDGE HOUND Vol 7 - issue 5
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    PATTERNS OF COILED-CASE SMALL AMMUNITION: THE BACHMANN RIFLE CARTRIDGE DANIEL R.LECLAIR, PH.D As with other European militaries in the 1860s, Belgium decided to take a two-step approach to rearming its infantry: conversion of existing stocks of muzzle-loaders, followed by adoption of a purpose-designed breech-loading rifle. It took two different and independent commissions, however, to specify the path to be taken. After several trials of existing ammunition types, one commission laid down...

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  • THE FACINATING WORLD OF MINIATURES Vol 7 - issue 5
    THE FACINATING WORLD OF MINIATURES Vol 7 - issue 5
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    Miniature weapons and related paraphernalia have been around for nearly as long as have the originals after which they are modeled. Incredible craftsmen, like the famous Swiss watchmakers, have been drawn to the challenge of miniaturization of firearms, blades, artillery and virtually anything else that represents the level of quality and complexity found in weaponry. In this column we will periodically look at the fine examples of this craft and the men who made them.

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  • TWO “CAMPFIRE MISMATCHED” CIVIL WAR REVOLVERS
    TWO “CAMPFIRE MISMATCHED” CIVIL WAR REVOLVERS
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    Collectors have adopted the term “campfire mismatch” to describe a military firearm with mismatched serial numbers where the numbers are relatively close to each other. Most often this term is used by those who have such a weapon for sale, undoubtedly in the hope of making a quicker sale since the implication is that such weapons are somewhat more “original'' than ones where the numbers are far apart. But intuitively there is some merit to this position. While we know that Civil War arms were...

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  • SWISS LUGERS
    SWISS LUGERS
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    As collectors we should owe a sense of gratitude to the early investigators and authors that documented their findings relating the development of the Pistole Parabellum. Given the times and methods of communication their results should be applauded. I specifically refer to Fred Datig, Harry Jones and John Walters. These gentlemen have provided us all a basis to build our appreciation of these historic technical achievements. Unfortunately there have been some early mistakes of timing and...

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  • ULTRA - RARE
    ULTRA - RARE
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    One of the most successful gun makers in circumventing the 1855 Rollin White patent for a bored-through cylinder was Daniel Moore of Brooklyn, N.Y. (Arms Heritage Vol. 1, No. 1). His first attempt was short lived. A year after incorporating the Moore’s Patent Firearms Company in November 1861, production of his popular seven-shot .32 caliber single action belt revolver (Fig. 1) was shut down when he lost a Smith & Wesson patent infringement lawsuit (Boulton).

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  • THE LAST CHAPTER PATENT CIRCUMVENTIONS
    THE LAST CHAPTER PATENT CIRCUMVENTIONS
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    This article wraps up the series on Patent Circumventions which began with our first issue and continued throughout the first six tears of publication. If we seem obsessed with this period in arms development it is because we feel that it represents one of the truly seminal eras in arms development, albeit in a negative way. Smith and Wesson’s acquisition of the rights to Rollin Whites patent in 1855 not only stymied competition and arms development for the 17 year span of that patent...

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