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AHM Volume 7 Issue 6

ARMS HERITAGE Magazine

  • THE LAST WORD Vol 7 - issue 6
    THE LAST WORD Vol 7 - issue 6
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    Responsible Record Keeping We all realize that we are only temporary custodians of the physical objects we call our ‘Collections”. At some time, our mortality dictates the inevitable transition of those items to others. When and if we think about it, most of us assume we will be able to choose the time to oversee that transition.

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  • I HAVE THIS GUN Vol 7 - issue 6
  • TIDBITS Vol 7 - issue 6
    TIDBITS Vol 7 - issue 6
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    Figures 1 through 7 show a rare, possibly unique arsenal gang mold. The mold is about 17 inches long and weighs about ten pounds. A removable piece can be reversed to enable either Mine or flat-based bullets to be cast.

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  • THE CARTRIDGE HOUND Vol 7 - issue 6
  • THE FACINATING WORLD OF MINIATURES Vol 7 - issue 6
    THE FACINATING WORLD OF MINIATURES Vol 7 - issue 6
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    Miniature weapons and related paraphernalia have been around for nearly as long as have the originals after which they are modeled. Incredible craftsmen, like the famous Swiss watchmakers, have been drawn to the challenge of miniaturization of firearms, blades, artillery and virtually anything else that represents the level of quality and complexity found in weaponry. In this column we will periodically look at the fine examples of this craft and the men who made them.

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  • WOODHEAD & HARTLEY, ETCHED “WRAGG & SONS”
    WOODHEAD & HARTLEY, ETCHED “WRAGG & SONS”
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    Woodhead & Hartley were in partnership and later became G. Woodhead. Wragg & Sons were a competing company that made similar Bowie Knives during the same time period as G. Woodhead. Both companies likely used some of the same little Mesters as suppliers. The partnerships of Woodhead & Hartley and Wragg & Sons are synonymous with classic extremely collectible Bowie Knives. 

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  • A SPOTSYLVANIA BATTLEFIELD TREE TRUNK
    A SPOTSYLVANIA BATTLEFIELD TREE TRUNK
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    The National Archives is a wonderful place for someone interested in military history, but the volume of material in the Archives’ holdings is absolutely overwhelming. If you ever hope to get any specific project done you pretty well have to narrow your focus to those records that are specifically related to your project. But even when you do you will often run across something that is just too interesting to pass by without notice.

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  • THE FINNISH LUGER
    THE FINNISH LUGER
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    Finnish military weapons of this period were an assortment of old well used Russian rifles and small caliber pistols. Finland was supplied by Deutsche Waffen und Munitionsfabriken (DWM) in Germany with 100 LP.08 Artillery Lugers during 1917 or early 1918. Each Artillery Luger had a stock, holster, 2 magazines and 200 cartridges included:

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  • THE ELEGANT CANTARINI AIR PISTOLS
    THE ELEGANT CANTARINI AIR PISTOLS
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    Over the years, I have had the immense pleasure to see and handle some of the finest antique air arms extant. Certainly, many of the most magnificent examples are safely tucked away in museums. But there are still enough beautiful specimens out there in private hands which can afford us the opportunity to personally handle and really get a first-hand sense of the high level of art and workmanship created by some of the old masters. I’d like to present this awesome matched pair of repeating...

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  • HISTORY OF THE SAVAGE REVOLVING FIREARMS COMPANY
    HISTORY OF THE SAVAGE REVOLVING FIREARMS COMPANY
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    As with many companies of the period, the formation of the Savage Revolving Firearms Company was the result of a series of historically significant events. The origin of the company actually begins with Simeon North, America’s first pistol maker. Simeon along with his brother-in-law Elisha Cheney received the first contract for a military pistol in 1799. After 500 were manufactured, a second contract was awarded for 1,500 in 1800. The North and Cheney as it became known was almost an exact...

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